Outer Cape Birding and Whale Watching Hike – April 14

LLOYD CENTER FOR THE ENVIRONMENT SPONSORS OUTER CAPE BIRDING AND WHALE WATCHING HIKE – APRIL 14

Cape Cod, MA – Venture to the outer cape with Lloyd Center Research Associate Jamie Bogart to see the Endangered Right Whales, which congregate along the cape during their northward migration to take advantage of the abundant zooplankton food source. Great views from shore of these unique mammals which are seldom seen in the wild are possible. A great variety of avian life including seabirds is also present during all seasons on Cape Cod, and will also be featured on this unique trip. Visits will include Race Point and Herring Cove Beach in Provincetown, with other stops likely depending upon location and visibility of the whales.

This event will take place on Saturday, April 14, 7:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. (poor weather date: Sunday, April 15). The cost to participate is $30 for Lloyd Center members and $35 for non-members (includes van transportation to and from the outer cape). Pre-registration is required by 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 12.

Space is limited to 12, so early registration is recommended. Participants are to meet at the Shaw’s Supermarket Parking Lot on Route 6 in Dartmouth (van departs promptly at 7:00 a.m. and returns at approximately 4:00 p.m.).

This walk is suitable for all levels … although some birding experience is beneficial. In addition, be advised that light forest hikes followed by a lengthy beach stroll make for a significant amount of walking*. Participants should dress in layers, wear outdoor footwear (that may get wet), bring binoculars or spotting scope, a camera and lunch.

Pre-register online, or call the Lloyd Center Event Line (508-558-2918).  If you have any specific questions about the program, call Jamie Bogart at 508-990-0505 x 23 or email at jbogart@lloydcenter.org

*Be advised: For best views of whales, this outing is done entirely on foot and involves extensive walking along beaches and possibly intertidal areas. Participants should therefore be capable of moderate to strenuous hiking for long distances.